Friday, June 8, 2018

What Does Breed Really Mean?

A Weimaraner over a choppy lake on a cloudy day


When you browse the web, visit parks, or spend time around dog owners in other settings, you’ll probably get
the impression that breed is very important. A lot of canine enthusiasts will make a point of proudly stating their
dog’s complex and exotic lineage, all with a list of names which most people won’t recognise. Of course, it’s really
nice to know where your dog came from. But, when it comes to breed, how much can this little bit of information
really tell you about your dog?


The Problem


Before delving into the insight this can give you into your furry friend, there is a problem which has to be considered.
Unfortunately, genetics isn’t as simple as looking at an animal and guessing where it has come from
based on its appearance. Complex tests have to be done, and it takes professionals years to be able
to decipher this intricate science. Unless you get your dog from a breeder which has been using pure-bred dogs
for generations, they won’t have a proper idea as to what your pooch is. Of course, some will be able to make a
good guess, but it takes a lab to get an accurate picture of their history.


A Solution


Thankfully, there is a solution to this issue, and it doesn’t have to be a pain to get the answers you’re looking for
using it. Dog DNA tests can be found all over the web, with a lot of options being very inexpensive. You simply take a
sample from your pooch, mail it off, and wait for a response with a genetic profile of your dog. Taking you back as far
as possible into their biological lineage, a test like this is one of the only ways to truly know what breed your
dog belongs to, and you can read more about them on loads of different sites. After all of this work, though,
you’ll want to get some sort of payoff.


What Can It Tell You?


This will come in the form of the insight the results will give you into your dog’s past. Not only will this be i
nteresting, but it can also give you the chance to give your dog a better life, as you will have a better understanding
of what makes them tick. Below, you can find some examples of the key areas which this will be the most helpful with.


Health: Some breeds of dog have tendencies to suffer from certain medical conditions, increasing their chances of
getting sick as they get older. If you know what your pooch could struggle with, you will be able to look out for
it, halting it in its tracks before it becomes a real problem. Along with this, it can also help you to figure
out the best course of action when it comes to keeping your dog healthy in day to day life.


Entertainment: A lot of dogs have been bred for particular traits, like the ability to hunt or the knack for being good
socially. When you’re playing with them, you have to make sure that you have this in mind, as it will alter the sort of
entertainment they enjoy the most. For example, hunting dogs will often prefer games which involve fetching and
chasing things, whereas social animals will want to play with other mutts.


Behaviour: Like a child, it can be hard to predict the future behaviour of an adult dog based on their personality as a
puppy. With a dog, though, you have the benefit of knowing their breed, as this can heavily tie into the way they act
once they have matured. Some canines are much better than others at being trained and understanding obedience.
Along with this, different breeds will also respond to different kinds of rewards.


Diet: Knowing what you should be feeding your dog to make sure they are healthy is much more than
simply emptying a can or two a day. Along with this, you need to make sure that you have a clear idea of what a
dog of their size and breed needs on a nutritional level. A vet should be able to help with this,
but it will also be worth reading some articles which are aimed at owners of your particular dog breed.


Hopefully, this post will inspire you to start working harder to take advantage of your dog’s breed.
A lot of people struggle with this area, finding it hard to give their pooch the time they need, especially when they get
into later life.

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